THE METALS COMPANY GOES UNDERWATER TO MEET INCREASING DEMANDS CAUSED BY THE TRANSITION TO ELECTRIC VEHICLES

SourceYahoo News
SectorOil & Gas
CountryMiddle east

Oops!Something went wrong.Please try again later.Oops!Something went wrong.Please try again later.Oops!Something went wrong.Please try again later.Mark GilmanJune 10, 2021, 8:38 AM·4 min readOops!Something went wrong.Please try again later.Oops!Something went wrong.Please try again later.Oops!Something went wrong.Please try again later.

Is the future of mining going underwater? The Metals Company, a developer of lower-impact battery metals from available seafloor polymetallic nodules no more prominent than 2 to 10cm, is betting on it.

Referring to the target of underwater mining exploration to find what The Metals Company refers to as a “battery in a rock,” the goal is determining the best path toward clean energy production. Polymetallic nodules found on the seafloor contain large amounts of base metals needed to make batteries. Collecting nodules is similar to the noninvasive task of picking up golf balls on a driving range instead of terrestrial miners who dig deep into the earth for lower quality metals.

Compared to land-based mining, polymetallic nodules can reduce the environmental, social and governance...read more...